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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
greetings fellow wheelers, I live in Southern California and am lucky enough to have five major off road areas an hour or less from my home. I spend most of my wheeling time in Big Bear, Calico or the Hammers in Johnson Valley. My rig, a 2001 TJ while doing double duty as a trail rig and daily driver has survived trails in California and Nevada as well. Here is a pic of me and the crew up on John Bull trail.

 

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I winched a TJ off that rock you have your right front wheel on about two years ago. He high centered his frame on it.
We were going the other direction. Great trail.
What area do you live in? I live in Temecula Valley.
Welcome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I winched a TJ off that rock you have your right front wheel on about two years ago. He high centered his frame on it.
We were going the other direction. Great trail.
What area do you live in? I live in Temecula Valley.
Welcome.
LOL,..it happens. I live in Apple Valley. And thanks for the welcome guys.
 

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I'm also in Southern Cal. I'll be back on the trails in a few weeks,fresh from Afghanistan and ready to have some fun. Any local clubs down south?
 

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I'm also in Southern Cal. I'll be back on the trails in a few weeks,fresh from Afghanistan and ready to have some fun. Any local clubs down south?
There are some "clubs" down there, and a LOT of Jeeps. I go on runs and camping with a lot of them and they are a good group to wheel with.
Just post up here when you return from Asscrackistan and we can get you wheeling in no time.
What kind of Jeep do you have and how is it equipped?
 

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LOL,..it happens. I live in Apple Valley. And thanks for the welcome guys.
You live in a great wheeling area. Short hops to some good trails for you.
And why do they call it Apple Valley when there are no apple trees anywhere around there? Cactus apples?
 

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It's desert! Must have taken a lot of water.
I used to camp at Dead Man's Point when I was a kid. It's just east of Apple Valley. Great dirt bike area and my dad had a Willys flat fender we used to explore in.
 

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Welcome to the board. I live just 70 miles up the road from you. We go there sometimes to go shopping. Maybe I will see you on the trails sometime.
 

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It's desert! Must have taken a lot of water.
I used to camp at Dead Man's Point when I was a kid. It's just east of Apple Valley. Great dirt bike area and my dad had a Willys flat fender we used to explore in.
Googled this bit history

In 1885, the railroad came northward through the Cajon Pass and established a train stop, calling it Victor(Victorville) on the Mojave River in the area then known as Mormon Crossing. John Brown helped build some of the first roads through Apple Valley opening up freight and stagecoach travel from the mining camps at Gold Mountain and Holcomb Valley to the railroad. In the 1860s, Mormon pioneer LaFayette Mecham built the wagon road, a short cut across the desert, now known as Stoddard Wells Road. Over the next few decades, Victorville boomed as the commercial center of the area with gold refineries, quarries, dance halls and saloons, while Apple Valley remained more pastoral with ranches and apple orchards.

The naming of Apple Valley is usually associated with John F. Appleton. However, the name was finalized with development in the 1940's. The Apple Valley name was officially recognized when a post office was established in 1949.[11]

One well known apple orchard was owned by Max Ihmsen, publisher of the Los Angeles Examiner newspaper. In 1915, he developed 320 acres (1.3 km2) of apples and pears. The fame of Apple Valley spread as Ihmsen fruit won many agricultural awards.[12] In the late 1930s, Ihmsen's son-in-law, Cal Godshall, took over the business operations and made the ranch famous as the birthplace of California college rodeo with the first intercollegiate rodeo competition ever held in the United States.

Apple farming in the area started to decline about the time Ihmsen Ranch fruit production was at its prime. Water rates shot up with a switch to electric pumps. World War I took owners and workers away with the draft. During the Great Depression many families left the mostly agricultural area looking for work. Washington and British Columbia apple growers were able to cut prices because they shipped their produce by river transportation, whereas Apple Valley apples were transported by rail or by truck. The death knell was a series of outbreaks of a virulent fungus infections coupled with frost, heat and hail in 1944, 1945 and 1946.[10]

A small orchard was maintained on the grounds of the Apple Valley Inn until it closed in 1986. But the last commercially grown apples in Apple Valley had all but disappeared before the US Post Office officially recognized the name.
 

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No wonder I never saw any apples there. I wasn't even born before the orchards died off.
Thanks for the info.
Dean Man's Point was a lot of fun in the winter, hell in the summer.
I'm older than dirt, but I'm not older than rocks.
So I remember climbing on these rock piles as a kid about ten.....



 

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